Articles by " Hugh"
Remove All Obstructions: The Long, Slow Road to Restoring Rhode Island’s Rivers

Remove All Obstructions: The Long, Slow Road to Restoring Rhode Island’s Rivers

There are roughly 800 dams still in existence in the tiny state of Rhode Island,  some of which date back to the colonial era. Read about the work being done to restore the rivers they stopped to their original state in a story that I wrote for 41°N magazine, a publication of Rhode Island Sea Grant and the Coastal Institute at the University of Rhode Island. remove_all_obstructions_2015

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Coffee Shop Conversation: URI Grad Students Present Findings at Science Café
By     |    Nov 12, 2015
Posted in: Uncategorized, URI, URI Coastal Institute, URI Graduate School of Oceanography     |    No Comments

Coffee Shop Conversation: URI Grad Students Present Findings at Science Café

Here’s the thing: you have five minutes to explain all you can about a project you’ve been working on for years. And you’re going to do it in front of a live audience. Ready? Go. If this sounds like a panic attack-inducing dream, you may not have done so well at URI’s recent Science Café. Fortunately the baker’s dozen presenters, all post-graduate students, did not panic as they spent 90 […]

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Artists Taking Flight at Audubon Expo
By     |    Nov 2, 2015
Posted in: Uncategorized     |    No Comments

Artists Taking Flight at Audubon Expo

“This guy walks into a bar and sees two people in a corner carving wood…” No, this isn’t the opening to a joke. It’s a bit of biography concerning one of the many carvers who will be putting in an appearance this weekend at Audubon Society of Rhode Island’s Bird and Wildlife Carving Exposition in Bristol. The two day event features 17 artists from around New England and New York […]

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There was an old lady who swallowed a fly…
By     |    Oct 3, 2015
Posted in: Moths, Ocean State Bird Club, Uncategorized     |    1 Comment

There was an old lady who swallowed a fly…

You DO realize SaNfaP is on Facebook, don’t you? Hit the “like” button here.   It’s dinner time, and there are two food sources in your fridge. One has spent its life eating salads. The other has grown up scavenging rotting fish and, well, feces. Choosing dinner would be simple, wouldn’t it? Except for one minor complication: the dish that holds the scavenger contains lobster. And the one holding the […]

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Raptors Invade ASRI’s Education Center
By     |    Sep 19, 2015
Posted in: ASRI, Audubon Society of Rhode Island, Uncategorized     |    No Comments

Raptors Invade ASRI’s Education Center

Follow Science and Nature for a Pie on Facebook here. Some feed on insects, others on mice. Still others dine on ducks, and a very few are capable of making off with Pepe the Chihuahua. Some have a punch that packs a wallop, and most could spot a vole a hundred yards away. What they all have in common is that they are all raptors, and they all came to […]

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“Who’s been sleeping in my bed?” Searching for bears in Rhode Island Woods
By     |    Aug 4, 2015
Posted in: Natural Science, RIDEM, Uncategorized, URI     |    No Comments

“Who’s been sleeping in my bed?” Searching for bears in Rhode Island Woods

Once upon a time there were three bears who lived in a house in the forest. There was a great big father bear, a middle-sized mother bear and a tiny baby bear. One morning, their breakfast porridge was too hot to eat, so they decided to go for a walk in the forest. While they were out, a little girl called Goldilocks came through the trees and found their house. […]

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New Frontiers in Archaeology
By     |    Jun 10, 2015
Posted in: Uncategorized     |    No Comments

New Frontiers in Archaeology

What do George Washington, a 2300-year-old Hellenistic port, and bird bones have in common? Find the answer by clicking on this link to my story in URI’s Momentum: Research & Innovation magazine. Archeology

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Coyotes are  back in town and it’s our fault
By     |    May 25, 2015
Posted in: Uncategorized     |    No Comments

Coyotes are back in town and it’s our fault

Note: Last time, we looked at the increasing coyote population and a study that is currently underway to determine their habits as a way of controlling them. This is the second of two stories in the series. “All of a sudden my dog stopped and when I looked behind me, there was a coyote larger than a German shepherd.” A woman is being interviewed on a local TV station after […]

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Where are all these coyotes coming from?
By     |    May 18, 2015
Posted in: Narragansett Bay Coyote Study, Natural Science, RINHS, Uncategorized     |    No Comments

Where are all these coyotes coming from?

    Note: This is part one of a two-part story. In 1996, the bay froze and the coyotes came. No one knows exactly why. The winter was harsh, like the one just past. Food was tough to come by, and perhaps the signs were promising that on Aquidneck Island, or maybe Conanicut Island, life would be easier. Anyway, they came. And that was when the trouble began. Sometime later, […]

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Sibling Day Siblicide
By     |    Apr 20, 2015
Posted in: Uncategorized     |    1 Comment

Sibling Day Siblicide

Note: By now, you’ve heard that there’s a Science and Nature Facebook page, right? Of course you have. Find photos, factoids, and more when you visit www.facebook.com/scienceandnatureforapie and hit “Follow”. You’ll feel better for it. Apparently Siblings Day happened. I only know this because there was an eruption of comments related to the issue on Facebook recently: “To the best sister!” “So lucky to have siblings like you guys!” “Love […]

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